Guitar Chord Theory Lesson: Augmented Triads

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A triad is a three note chord. Most larger chords are built from triads. There are four kinds of triads; major, minor, diminished and augmented. This video explains augmented triads. If you haven’t watched my videos on Major Triads, and Minor & Diminished Triads, you will want to watch those videos before you watch this video. Here are the links:

Guitar Chord Theory Lesson – The Major Triad

Guitar Chord Theory Lesson – Minor & Diminished Triads

Also, if you have trouble identifying what notes are what on the fretboard, watch my video, “How to Learn & Memorize the Guitar Fretboard,” here is the link:

Thanks for watching, see ya next time!

Guitar Chord Theory Lesson – Minor & Diminished Triads

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I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger


A triad is a three note chord. Most larger chords are built from triads. There are four kinds of triads; major, minor, diminished and augmented. This video explains minor and diminished triads. If you haven’t watched my video on Major Triads, you will want to watch that video before you watch this video. Here is the link:

Guitar Chord Theory Lesson – The Major Triad

Thanks for watching, see ya next time!

Guitar Chord Theory Lesson – The Major Triad

Subscribe to “BetterWorldGuitar” on Youtube – to see more guitar lessons and get notified when new fingerstyle guitar arrangements and step-by-step tutorials are posted.



I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger




A triad is a three note chord. Most other chords can be built from the triad. This video explains Major Triads. The formula for major triads is R-3-5. This means we use the root, 3rd, and 5th notes of a major scale to build a major triad. In the key of G, our notes would be G-B-D. In the key of D, the notes would be D-F#-A.

How to Create a Major Scale – Guitar Lesson

How to Learn & Memorize the Guitar Fretboard

Thanks for watching, see ya next time!

Crazy – Patsy Cline – Fingerstyle Guitar Cover

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I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger




This fingerstyle guitar arrangement is from Hal Leonard’s “Fingerpicking Country” except for the last bit where I added in the part where the key changes which is in the original Patsy Cline recording.

“Crazy” is a ballad composed by Willie Nelson. It has been recorded by several artists, most notably by Patsy Cline, whose version was a #2 country hit in 1962.

Partly due to the genre-blending nature of the song, it has been covered by dozens of artists in several genres over the years; nevertheless, the song remains inextricably linked with Cline. Nelson’s own version appears on his 1962 debut album …And Then I Wrote.

Do Fingerstyle Guitar Fingerpicks Cause Tendinitis?

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I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger




After using fingerpicks and a thumbpick for my fingerstyle guitar playing for a few years, I’m considering going back to fingernails and/or flesh depending on how my fingernails hold up.

Some knowledgeable guitarists that I respect have cautioned against incorporating any unnatural contortions in your playing including the use of finger picks and also any type of anchoring of your fingers on the soundboard.

Leo Kottke said in the July 1998 issue of “Guitar for the Practicing Musician”, in an article titled “Mr. Natural” that he had to give up his fingerpicks after his doctor told him he had tendinitis. He eventually got rid of his thumbpick as well. He said, “You need a little “Mr. Natural” in your technique, because if there is any contortion anywhere, you can really hurt yourself.”

Your Song – Elton John Cover – Fingerstyle Guitar

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I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger




“Your Song” is a ballad composed and performed by English musician Elton John with lyrics by his longtime collaborator Bernie Taupin. It originally appeared on John’s self-titled second album (1970).

The song was released in the United States in October 1970 as the B-side to “Take Me to the Pilot”. Both received airplay, but “Your Song” was preferred by disc jockeys and replaced “Take Me to the Pilot” as the A-side, eventually making the top ten on both the UK and US charts.

In 1998, “Your Song” was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 2004 the song was placed at number 137 on Rolling Stone ’​s list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time”.

A demo version was included on John’s 1990 box set album To Be Continued. The song has been covered by a number of artists, including Ellie Goulding, whose version reached number two on the UK Singles Chart in late 2010.

Fingerstyle Guitar Arrangement via Hal Leonard “Fingerpicking Ballads”

How to Learn & Memorize the Guitar Fretboard

Subscribe to “BetterWorldGuitar” on Youtube – to see more guitar lessons and get notified when new fingerstyle guitar arrangements and step-by-step tutorials are posted.



I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger




Learning and memorizing all the notes on the guitar fretboard will help you tremendously as you progress in your guitar studies. In this video we first discuss the 12 notes of our musical system and how to find them on the guitar fingerboard.

Next, a method is explained that will help you memorize all the notes on the guitar fret board. Just five minutes a day of practice with this method will have you memorizing the entire guitar neck in a short amount of time, and this knowledge will help you reach new heights in your playing and enjoyment of the guitar.

M*A*S*H Theme Song (Suicide is Painless) Fingerstyle Guitar Cover – FREE TAB!

I put a video of a slightly different arrangement of this song on my youtube channel in 2012, but I recently tweaked the arrangement to more follow the original Johnny Mandel recording.


Free Fingerstyle Guitar Tab for MASH Theme Song, “Suicide is Painless”:

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Roger



“Suicide Is Painless” is a song written by Johnny Mandel (music) and Mike Altman (lyrics), which is best known for having been featured as the theme song for both the movie and TV series M*A*S*H. The actual title is “Song from M*A*S*H (Suicide is Painless)”. Mike Altman is the son of the original film’s director, Robert Altman, and was 14 years old when he wrote the song’s lyrics. During an appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson in the 1980s, Robert Altman said that his son had earned more than a million US dollars for having co-written the song while he only made US$70,000 for having directed the movie.

The song is played during the film’s opening credits, sung by uncredited session singers John Bahler, Tom Bahler, Ron Hicklin and Ian Freebairn-Smith (the vocals are sometimes misattributed to Johnny Mandel, due to his being the only name officially credited for the song). Additionally, the movie also features a scene that begins when Walter Koskiusko Waldowski, a dentist nicknamed “The Painless Pole”, declares his intention to commit suicide, and the song is sung by Ken Prymus (playing Private Seidman) during the suicide scene. Several instrumental versions of the song were used as the theme for the TV series. Credited to “The Mash” when it appeared on the film’s soundtrack album on Columbia/CBS Records in 1970,[1] it belatedly became a number one hit in the UK in 1980 after being championed by BBC Radio 1 DJ Noel Edmonds.

The song was ranked #66 on AFI’s 100 Years…100 Songs.