How to Arrange Fingerstyle Guitar – Where to Start

Hey guys, this is a new tutorial series I’m starting on how to make your own arrangements for solo acoustic fingerstyle guitar.

The song we will be arranging in this series is “Hello” by Adele.

The first thing you have to do before you begin arranging a song for solo fingerstyle guitar is to decide what song you are going to arrange. It should be a song that you really enjoy listening to, and therefore you will also enjoy playing the song and you will enjoy the process of seeing your arrangement develop over time.

Personally, for me, this arranging of a fingerstyle guitar piece is a fun challenge and I always try to improve my arranging abilities with every song I tackle. My personal choice is to not look at any other fingerstyle guitar arrangements of the song I am working on until after I have fully completed my arrangement. This allows me to exercise my creativity and build up skill in finding different ways to arrange a song. After I have completed my arrangement, then I will listen to other fingerstyle guitar arrangements to see what others did and what I could have done better. This is the best for me because after I have spent many, many hours working on an arrangement of a song, I get familiar with the particular challenges of that song and I am more able to appreciate what others have done with their arrangement of the same song. I learn much more this way rather than to just look at other’s arrangements beforehand and copying what they do.

The first two things we need to know before we start our solo instrumental finger-style guitar arrangement are:

1. The harmony – also known as the chords to the song.

2. The melody – also known as the lyrics or words of the song.

The combination of these two elements is what makes up the solo fingerstyle guitar arrangement. We will play both the harmony and the melody of the song at the same time on one guitar. The challenge is to arrange the music so it sounds good on a single guitar and is playable without too much difficulty.

So our next step is to get the chords and the melody elements of our song and there are many different resources available to get this information, which we will talk about in part 2 of this series.

Continued in part 2

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Roger

Mr. Bojangles – Chet Atkins Fingerstyle Guitar Cover

From Chet Atkins’ “Almost Alone” Album.

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Roger

While My Guitar Gently Weeps – Fingerstyle Guitar

Here is my fingerstyle guitar version of “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.”

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Roger

Phrygian Acoustic Guitar Improv with Looper – “Running Blind”

Experimenting and improvising with the phrygian mode on a Taylor 314ce acoustic guitar and a Boss RC-50 Looper. I call it “Running Blind.”

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Roger



Acoustic Guitar Imrov with Boss RC-50 Looper – Aeolian – “Going to Sleep”

Messing around with the looper and the Aeolian mode aka the “Natural Minor” scale. I call this “Going to Sleep.”

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Roger

Dark, Haunting, Guitar Music Made Easy – The Frightening Phrygian Mode

Happy Halloween all. Spooky, scary music is easy once you learn this simple formula. If you know how to play a major scale, then you can immediately apply this formula to turn the “happy” sounding major scale into a “dark and haunting” sounding Phrygian scale.

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Roger



Taylor Acoustic Guitar Nut / Neck Widths – 1 11/16″ or 1 3/4″ ?

Just got the new issue of “Wood & Steel,” the Taylor Guitar quarterly magazine and a question in the “Ask Bob” section got me onto the subject of guitar nut widths.

I measure the nut / neck widths on my Taylor 314ce and 314ce-N nylon string guitars as well as on my Yamaha FG720S steel string acoustic.

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Roger

The Genius and the Insanity of the Guitar Fretboard

The way the guitar fretboard is layed out is sometimes very confusing. With this one simple trick you will be able to understand and see very clearly the logic behind all the chords you have already been playing. The fingerboard will now make sense!

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Roger

Intermediate Classical Guitar Lesson – Carcassi – Op. 59, No. 16 – Part 4 – Free TAB / Tutorial

Learn to play Opus 59, No. 16, “Caprice” by Matteo Carcassi. This is an intermediate classical guitar piece, and this is part 4 of a 4 part series. You can download the tab / sheet music .PDF file via the link below.

Subscribe to “BetterWorldGuitar” on Youtube – to see this lesson and get notified when new classical & fingerstyle guitar arrangements and step-by-step tutorials are posted.



I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger




Learn to play this song:


Matteo Carcassi, Op. 59, No. 16 “Caprice” 4-Part Classical Guitar Lesson Video Series


To see more classical & fingerstyle guitar tutorials coming please subscribe to BetterWorldGuitar on Youtube here.



Free Guitar Tab for Matteo Carcassi, Op. 59, No. 16



Please consider helping to support these free fingerstyle guitar arrangements and lessons by purchasing a vintage guitar magazine from me.



Matteo Carcassi (1792 – 16 January 1853) was a famous Italian guitarist and composer.

Carcassi was born in Florence, Italy, and first studied the piano, but learned guitar when still a child. He quickly gained a reputation as a virtuoso concert guitarist.

He moved to Germany in 1810, gaining almost immediate success. In 1815, he was living in Paris, earning his living as a teacher of both the piano and the guitar. On a concert tour in Germany in 1819, he met his friend Antoine Meissonnier for the first time. Also a famous guitarist, Meissonnier published many of Carcassi’s works in his Paris publishing house. For Meissonnier he also arranged a number of popular songs for guitar that were originally written for piano, including works by Théodore Labarre and Loïsa Puget.

From 1820 on, Carcassi spent the majority of his time in Paris. In 1823, he performed an extremely successful series of concerts in London that earned him great fame, both as a performing artist and as a teacher. However, in Paris, a long time passed before his talents were truly recognized, partly because of the presence of Ferdinando Carulli.

Carcassi was in Germany again during autumn 1824. Afterwards he performed in London, where his reputation now gave him access to more prestigious concert halls. Finally he returned to Paris. For several years, he made concert trips from here to the most important cultural towns of Europe, including London. After a short return to performing in 1836, he quit his concert practice around 1840 and died in Paris in 1853.

Carcassi wrote a method for guitar (op. 59), first published with Schott in Mainz, in 1836. It is still valuable, relevant and interesting. His most famous works are collected in his 25 Etudes op. 60. In these, he managed to blend technical skills and brilliant romantic music. This is the reason his music is still played by so many classical guitarists today.

Intermediate Classical Guitar Lesson – Carcassi – Op. 59, No. 16 – Part 3 – Free TAB / Tutorial

Learn to play Opus 59, No. 16, “Caprice” by Matteo Carcassi. This is an intermediate classical guitar piece, and this is part 3 of a 4 part series. You can download the tab / sheet music .PDF file via the link below.

Subscribe to “BetterWorldGuitar” on Youtube – to see this lesson and get notified when new classical & fingerstyle guitar arrangements and step-by-step tutorials are posted.



I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger




Learn to play this song:


Matteo Carcassi, Op. 59, No. 16 “Caprice” 4-Part Classical Guitar Lesson Video Series


To see more classical & fingerstyle guitar tutorials coming please subscribe to BetterWorldGuitar on Youtube here.



Free Guitar Tab for Matteo Carcassi, Op. 59, No. 16



Please consider helping to support these free fingerstyle guitar arrangements and lessons by purchasing a vintage guitar magazine from me.



Matteo Carcassi (1792 – 16 January 1853) was a famous Italian guitarist and composer.

Carcassi was born in Florence, Italy, and first studied the piano, but learned guitar when still a child. He quickly gained a reputation as a virtuoso concert guitarist.

He moved to Germany in 1810, gaining almost immediate success. In 1815, he was living in Paris, earning his living as a teacher of both the piano and the guitar. On a concert tour in Germany in 1819, he met his friend Antoine Meissonnier for the first time. Also a famous guitarist, Meissonnier published many of Carcassi’s works in his Paris publishing house. For Meissonnier he also arranged a number of popular songs for guitar that were originally written for piano, including works by Théodore Labarre and Loïsa Puget.

From 1820 on, Carcassi spent the majority of his time in Paris. In 1823, he performed an extremely successful series of concerts in London that earned him great fame, both as a performing artist and as a teacher. However, in Paris, a long time passed before his talents were truly recognized, partly because of the presence of Ferdinando Carulli.

Carcassi was in Germany again during autumn 1824. Afterwards he performed in London, where his reputation now gave him access to more prestigious concert halls. Finally he returned to Paris. For several years, he made concert trips from here to the most important cultural towns of Europe, including London. After a short return to performing in 1836, he quit his concert practice around 1840 and died in Paris in 1853.

Carcassi wrote a method for guitar (op. 59), first published with Schott in Mainz, in 1836. It is still valuable, relevant and interesting. His most famous works are collected in his 25 Etudes op. 60. In these, he managed to blend technical skills and brilliant romantic music. This is the reason his music is still played by so many classical guitarists today.