Taylor Acoustic Guitar Nut / Neck Widths – 1 11/16″ or 1 3/4″ ?

Just got the new issue of “Wood & Steel,” the Taylor Guitar quarterly magazine and a question in the “Ask Bob” section got me onto the subject of guitar nut widths.

I measure the nut / neck widths on my Taylor 314ce and 314ce-N nylon string guitars as well as on my Yamaha FG720S steel string acoustic.

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The Genius and the Insanity of the Guitar Fretboard

The way the guitar fretboard is layed out is sometimes very confusing. With this one simple trick you will be able to understand and see very clearly the logic behind all the chords you have already been playing. The fingerboard will now make sense!

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Taylor Acoustic Guitar Truss Rod Adjustment – 314ce-N

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A quality guitar usually has the truss rod adjusted at the factory to the manufacturers’ specifications, but if you change the gauge of strings you use or if the weather or humidity has changed, or if you just have a particular preference in your playing style, you may want to adjust the truss rod, even on a new guitar.

A truss rod is an adjustable steel rod inside the neck of the guitar that can be adjusted by loosening or tightening a nut at either the peghead or through the soundhole of the guitar.

Your truss rod may need adjusting if the neck of your guitar has too much or too little upbow or backbow.

Tightening the truss rod adjusment nut (clockwise) will lower the action (distance between the strings and fretboard); loosening the nut allows the neck to relax into an upbow and will increase the action. Controlled upbow is known as relief.

2 main reasons your truss rod needs adjusting:

1. There’s a noticeable change in the action; the height of the strings over the frets has become either too high or too low. The most common scenario is that the strings get higher as the neck upbows from the string pull.

2. Some strings buzz on the frets between the nut and the fifth fret. This indicates that the neck is either too straight or it is backbowed from the truss rod’s slow, constant pressure over time.

This truss rod adjustment demonstration is done on a Taylor 314-ce, nylon string acoustic guitar. The tool used is a truss rod adjustment tool that has a 1/4″ nut driver on one end, and a phillips screwdriver on the other end. It costs about three dollars and can be found online or at your local music store.

How to Read Taylor Guitar Serial Numbers – When was my guitar made?

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I appreciate all your likes, shares, comments and subscriptions. Thank you for your support and thanks for stopping by! ~Roger

Wondering what year your Taylor guitar was made? The new Taylor 10-digit serial number that started on November 2, 2009, identifies the factory of production, year, date and the assigned number of the guitar on that day’s production schedule. Watch the video for the full explanation.

From 1993 until the end of 1999, each Taylor guitar featured a nine-digit serial number that precisely pinpoints when work was begun on that guitar. As of 2000, the serial number expanded to 11 digits to accommodate the four-digit year designation. Reading left to right, the first two digits (or four starting in 2000) represent the year; the second pair of digits represent the month; and the third pair of digits represents the calendar day that work was begun. The seventh digit is a series code number – 0 for 300 or 400 Series, 1 for 500 thru Presentation Series, 2 for 200 Series, 3 for Baby and Big Baby Series, 5 for T5, 7 for Nylon Series, 8 for 100 Series, and 9 for SolidBody Series. The last two digits denote the guitar’s position in that day’s production sequence. For models older than 1993, please refer to the chart below.

SERIAL NUMBERS YEAR
[didn’t use serial numbers!] 1974
10109 to 10146 1975
20147 to 20315 1976
30316 to [–]450 1977
451 to 900 1978
901 to 1300 1979
1301 to 1400 1980
1401 to 1670 1981
1671 to 1951 1982
1952 to 2445 1983
2446 to 3206 1984
3207 to 3888 1985
3889 to 4778 1986
4779 to 5981 1987
5982 to 7831 1988
7832 to 10070 1989
10071 to 12497 1990
12498 to 15249 1991
15250 to 17947 1992

Do Fingerstyle Guitar Fingerpicks Cause Tendinitis?

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After using fingerpicks and a thumbpick for my fingerstyle guitar playing for a few years, I’m considering going back to fingernails and/or flesh depending on how my fingernails hold up.

Some knowledgeable guitarists that I respect have cautioned against incorporating any unnatural contortions in your playing including the use of finger picks and also any type of anchoring of your fingers on the soundboard.

Leo Kottke said in the July 1998 issue of “Guitar for the Practicing Musician”, in an article titled “Mr. Natural” that he had to give up his fingerpicks after his doctor told him he had tendinitis. He eventually got rid of his thumbpick as well. He said, “You need a little “Mr. Natural” in your technique, because if there is any contortion anywhere, you can really hurt yourself.”